Grace Lee Boggs on Detroit, Gardens, and Revolution

Grace Lee Boggs was featured in Detroit artist Invincible's hip-hop video. Photo fromEMERGENCEmedia313/YouTube

Mother Jones

Grace Lee Boggs is a ninety-five-year-old veteran activist who is redefining what revolution means in the Motor City. Boggs’ new book, The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century is both a memoir and a manifesto—a portrait of a young woman’s journey through several major social movements, and the lessons she hopes to share with a new generation of activists.

In the early 1940’s the young Chinese-American woman finished her doctorate in philosophy and began looking for a professorship. She quickly found herself facing departments that unblinkingly told her, “We don’t hire orientals.” As if dealing with that racism wasn’t enough, she bucked the prejudices of the Civil Rights era and married Black Power and labor activist, Jimmy Boggs, in the early 1950’s. At the height of the McCarthy era, she was “radicalized” by hanging around Marxist leaders such as A. Phillip Randolph and C.L.R. James. Those influences stayed with her when she moved to Detroit, where she joined the race and labor movements during the city’s most riotous years.

Boggs encourages readers to redefine their own ideas about current efforts towards social justice.

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